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Posts Tagged ‘WebLogs’

XP Development Weblog (German)

01.06.2007 · Posted in Links

XP – Development is a german blog about agile software development. It focuses mainly on Extreme Programming and Scrum. Also presents tools for asp.net and php5. A complete framework is planned.
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A Tune-Up for TDD?

11.29.2006 · Posted in Links

I feel that TDD is too difficult to learn. This is of great concern to me. I work in a large company on a large project. I think it should be of great concern to the rest of the Agile community too. It seems to me that TDD presents the greatest risk to successful adoption of an Agile methodology by large projects/organizations.

My gut has been pointing me in the general vicinity of testability for just over a year. About a month ago I realized why. The fifth step of TDD, refactor out duplication, is the culprit. The fifth step is geared toward a master not a beginner. Identifying duplication is not as simple as it might sound. Much more than copy and paste duplication is targeted. Behavioral duplication is the real target. Seeing this type of duplication is much more of a right brain activity than a left brain activity.

Author: Jay Flowers
Published: November 19th, 2006
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Méchoui’s dev Lunch

11.29.2006 · Posted in Links

In this blog, I tried to explain why we must separate the tests we create into layers.

This separation in layers enables better efficiency in development processes, because not every test can be a "unit test", and because there may be so many tests that it may take hours to run.

I did not focus on technologies but more on develomment process.

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Agile Advice weblog

08.22.2006 · Posted in Links

Multi-author weblog about agile methods. Includes several articles about quality and testing including an article called Quality is Not Negotiable that briefly discusses the author’s experiences with TDD and why it is so important.
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Test Early weblog

04.25.2006 · Posted in Links

Test Early is the leading industry weblog dedicated to early developer testing. Topics include build management, continuous integration, developer testing, code complexity, code coverage, code metrics, along with business perspectives and important industry news related to the general testing environment. Test Early is passionate about building software quality into the development process – this portal will be very beneficial to anyone seeking to make their code more defect-resistant.
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Software Testing and Quality Assurance RSS Feed

02.20.2006 · Posted in Links

Receive the latest articles, white papers, presentations and templates published by LogiGear right on your desktop. LogiGear’s RSS feed includes weekly articles from industry thought leaders such as Hung Nguyen, Hans Buwalda, and Michael Hackett.
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The Team Foundation blog

12.23.2004 · Posted in Links

For those who are unfamiliar with the Foundation, it is the server-based part of Team System that ties together many of the various pieces of the software development lifecycle. It provides a suite of source control, work item tracking, Excel and Project integration, reporting, project portal, and build automation functionality for seamless and effective management of a team-driven development project.

Although there are a number of online resources about Team System, few focus solely on Team Foundation. Moreover, there are bits and pieces of information on the web about the Foundation, but few are organized in a central, cohesive manner. This is where this blog comes in.
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JUnit testing Velocity

11.15.2004 · Posted in Links

Clifton Craig writes: "I’ve recently been having some trouble getting velocity to do what I want it to do. I dreamt up an ad-hoc GUI widget that would evaluate arbitrary VTL strings and display the result for testing. The nifty little widget was never completed. After reading this tip I may scrap my GUI code all together."

(via Matt Raible)
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Refactoring Our Way to Glory (2): Implementing a Save operation

10.04.2004 · Posted in Links

Steve Maine writes: "To recap, there are few simple rules that I’m trying to stick to as I grow this pattern. They are:
– Entities do not perform their own lifecycle management. The persistence of an entity is handled by its Repository, and its instantiation is handled via its Factory.
– Each entity talks only to its own repository.
– Repositories talk to other Repositories through the RepositoryFactory.
– Avoid singletons as much as possible."
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NMock to the rescue

09.22.2004 · Posted in Links

Ben Carey writes: "I was working with Drew today and preparing for our .Net Users Group presentation on leveraging open source development tools with .Net. For this presentation, we have consistently met at Panera because of the free wifi access. When we arrived this evening we were unable to connect to the wifi. At first, this seemed like a pretty big problem, but it ended up being a perfect scenario for how mock objects can provide a significant advantage…"
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It’s the Exceptions, Stupid

09.17.2004 · Posted in Links

Mats Helander writes: "While a green light won’t actually tell you that a feature is working [..] a red light will tell you something very interesting indeed — namely that something in your app doesn’t work, or at least does not behave according to your expectations."
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Just In Time Testing

09.06.2004 · Posted in Links

Len Holgate writes: "Once we’d integrated the new data provider we were in a position to do some more testing. We configured the code that used the new component to request the same data from the new component and the old code and to save the data to files. Then we wrote some code to compare the files and highlight any changes. Once that was done we located the source of the differences, wrote tests that failed due to the problems and then started to fix the bugs."
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How Pope Gregory converted me to Unittestitarianism on February 29, 1600

09.01.2004 · Posted in Links

Jekke Bladt writes: "A pretty clear indication that this job was not going to be like other jobs came on the very first day when I was given my first task. It was, ‘Download a copy of nUnit, install it, put it through its paces, and report back.’ Maybe this is typical for some people, but I was a consultant for ten years. In my experience, a typical first task is, ‘We have seventeen days before we go into the quiet period before our IPO. We need you to build a stock quote and index reporting system for our website using the Reuters feeds.’ [..] one downside of this unusual request was that I was expected to vet a piece of unit testing software on day one — before I’d written any code that could be tested."
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Preemptive Testing

08.27.2004 · Posted in Links

Michael Hunter writes: "’Everyone knows’ that testers can’t do anything until they have something to test. [..] Therefore it goes without saying that testers are pretty much useless until Dev has written enough bugs (erm, code, I should have said) that there is something worth testing. This puts Test perpetually behind the curve with no chance of ever catching up. While Dev has moved on to the next milestone Test is still banging on the previous one. Any bugs they find are often ignored until Dev can bear to pull themselves off their fun new work back onto all that boring ‘completed’ code they wrote last milestone. The only reason the product ever ships is that eventually the Devs hit code complete and (theoretically, at least) stop writing features and focus completely on fixing bugs."
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testingReflections

08.24.2004 · Posted in Links

A mind-share blog for the Software Development and Testing community… A place to share your knowledge in software testing – from unit to acceptance, functional to security testing and let’s not forget performance testing.

testingReflections provides blog-space to people wanting to write about software testing and incorporates content from numerous feeds, including testdriven.com and a growing list of testing experts and other practitioners.
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Singleton Unit Testing…

08.21.2004 · Posted in Links

Jonathan de Halleux writes: "At first sight it may seem that Singleton and Unit Testing are not compatible since you cannot ensure the separation between the tests. We could solve the problem by instanciating a new ‘Singleton’ instance for each test and apply test on this ‘local’ instance. The problem is that a well implemented Singleton is sealed and it’s constructor are private and thus you cannot create this instance."
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Executing NUnit tests on the Compact Framework

08.13.2004 · Posted in Links

"I have developed a test runner for the CF 1.0 that uses NUnit 2.2. I’ve been using it for a few weeks now, and I’ve actually enjoyed it. [Recent posts] convinced me that my current solution is lacking. What would be a better solution would be a way to somehow integrate into the NUnit desktop runners, either the command line or the gui, and have the results of the tests be reported on the desktop rather than on the device."
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Faulty Technique Dichotomy

08.09.2004 · Posted in Links

Martin Fowler writes: "Several friends of mine commented how stored procedures were a disaster because they weren’t kept in version control (instead they had names like GetCust01, GetCust02, GetCust02B etc). That’s not a problem with stored procedures, that’s a problem with people not using them properly. Similar a criticism that TDD led to a brittle design on further questioning led to the discovery that the team in question hadn’t done any refactoring – and refactoring is a critical step in TDD."
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